GLOBAL HEALTH INFLUENCERS BLOG

TEAM(S) NICARAGUA: CLINIC DAY 4

August 11, 2017

NICARAGUA TEAM ONE (Sébaco)

The word of the day today is vulnerability. It’s so easy to feel insecure in a foreign environment. The unknown is always  scary in life but when new people, a new country, foods, and customs are involved it always seems worse.

I came to Nicaragua with a decades old “Bucket List” in mind and wanted to check it off. It seemed the moral and Christian thing to do. I, however, never realized what a gift I was giving myself. Seeing so many come together to help reach a common goal has been amazing especially at such a divisive time in our world’s history.

Hearing each others’ life stories has been both inspiring and heart breaking. Devotionals at 5:45 AM seemed “iffy” but most everyone attended and were blessed for having done so. The richness of “community”, both ours and our patients’ have been MUCHO evident.

I go home in a few days with a new respect for missions—the strength and tenacity of the human spirit, and its place in the world. I find myself blessed beyond measure.

“From those who are given much, much is required.”

I also cannot help but comment on the Mother-Daughter teams, and how proud I am of my time with my daughter. I am proud of her contribution. I am sure that the other mothers feel the same. What a memory for them and for us!

+ Len Hickman, Nurse

TEAM UGANDA: CLINIC DAY 4

Hello again!! I’m sitting on the same dusty wood floors where I recounted my first few days in Uganda and I couldn’t be more joyful. The past few days I REALLY cannot put into words. I always say that when referring to Uganda, but trust me- that speaks volumes.

My last trip to the heavenly green-coated landscapes littered with raw, untouched land was beyond expectation. From the team to those first culture-shocking experiences and the incredible medical feats completed each and every day at clinic, I really didn’t think I could beat it.

Fortunately for me, I have a God that works beyond human expectation and belief. Where I thought I had seen rare medical abnormalities, He placed a girl born without the formation of a sternum; where I thought I had experienced intense longing for love from innocent brown eyes, He placed a young girl who refused to let go of my hand, my pant leg, and especially my heart; where I thought I had seen extreme poverty, He placed me in front of a 10 pound baby, that had only been fed twice a day for his five months of life.

Our God is SO eager to allow us to see what breaks his heart, and for that mine breaks as well. Don’t get me wrong, my first African experience is so close to my heart.. but what an experience it is to allow new memories into this part of my heart.

Among the tragedy, the poverty, and the heartbreak is incredible love and soul-filling joy!  The people we’ve met fingerprint the deepest parts of my soul and already have me wishing for more time. The dirt, the bugs falling from the ceiling, the unintentional dreadlocks from millions of babies braiding my mane are so worth every second of my time here.

Webale, Uganda!

+ Emilia Vawter, College of Charleston Student

TEAM(S) NICARAGUA: CLINIC DAY 3

August 10, 2017

NICARAGUA TEAM ONE (Sébaco)

Torrential rains and strong winds with thunder and lightning in the true nature of a tropical rain storm ended our day and cooled our bodies. We were at a school outside of Sébaco and cared for 200 patients ranging in age from a few weeks old to 90 years old!

Our spiritual word for today is “compassion” to remind us to be caring, not aloof, and not mechanical but to be really there with our patients. W want to listen to them and help them feel the love of God through our efforts.

+ Nancy Bailey

 

NICARAGUA TEAM TWO (El Viejo)

What a wonderful Wednesday!

Our team traveled to a school west of El Viejo. When we arrived some of the children were still in school so we set up in the available classrooms. There’s always logistics and problem solving that go into getting clinic moving but we are becoming pros for sure.

Our team is amazing and worked so hard to see as many patients as possible, even waiting at the end for a few more patients to arrive. We treated our most patients yet, 265! The physicians and pharmacy were troopers working to meet every last patient’s need.

We also had a team member birthday! FELIZ CUMPLEAÑOS Adriana. A big birthday song was in order at the end of our workday and birthday cake with a trick candle after dinner!

+ Abby Wiggins, UK College of Pharmacy Student

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